Show 38

This week’s edition of Treasure Ivan has more stories and less music than usual. First up is brief tale by Frank Luther called “The Three Trees.” Frank Luther was a singer and storyteller during the 1930’s and 1940’s. He was extremely popular with children and was in fact called the Bing Crosby of children’s music. Frank Luther is also credited with writing “Barnacle Bill the Sailor.”

Paul Bunyan is the hero of many an American tall tale. On this show, you’ll hear about the birth of Paul Bunyan as told in story and song by Tom Glazer. It would seem that a sequel never came about to this recording, but it does contain all the exaggerated stories that make Bunyan legends live to this day. Tom Glazer, who followed in Frank Luther’s footsteps, may be best known today for composing “On Top of Spaghetti.”

Buffalo Bob, Clarabell the Clown, and Flub-a-Dub were all essential parts of the early television days when Howdy Doody ruled the afternoon airwaves. Children who had access to televisions gathered around them to watch Howdy and dream about being in the Peanut Gallery. Naturally, the show produced a slew of (now-collectible) merchandise, including this recording, which features Howdy and Buffalo Bob with their magic Air-0-Doodle, zooming through “a Howdy Doody World.”

Barbara Streisand played the part of Fanny Brice in the motion picture “Funny Girl.” Fanny Brice played the part of Baby Snooks on radio in the 1930’s and 1940’s. Treasure Ivan plays a selection from “Baby Snooks Learns” a recording on Capitol Records in which Snooks learns her lessons the hard way. A double-spanking occurs at the end of the story to the delight of youngsters who heard it. (Frankie Laine and Jimmy Boyd sing “Tell Me A Story” following Baby Snooks, and yes, there is another unabashed spanking session. Nice to know things are more enlightened now)

And finally, we have two great records about American Indians winding up this week’s program. One is an intelligent retelling of a Native American legend and the other is a Warner’s Brothers’ slightly offensive, Bozo Approved, cartoon version. “Bugs Bunny Meets Hiawatha” is filled with stereotypes created by Mel Blanc at the peak of his career. “The Eagle and the Thrush” is a real Native American Tale and a gorgeous one at that. Algernon Black was responsible for turning this story into a phonograph record for children. He was also leader of the Ethical Culture Society and the author of many books.

Jig-A-Jig-Jig
Frank Luther

Frank Luther

Frank Luther

The Three Trees
Frank Luther

Paul Bunyan
Tom Glazer

Howdy Doody & the Air-O-Doodle

Howdy Doody & the Air-O-Doodle

Howdy Doody’s Air-O-Doodle
Buffalo Bob Smith

Baby Snooks Learns to Tell the Truth
Fanny Brice & Hanley Stafford

Baby Snooks Learns

Baby Snooks Learns

Tell Me a Story
Frankie Laine & Jimmy Boyd

Bugs Bunny Meets Hiawatha
Mel Blanc

The Eagle & the Thrush

The Eagle & the Thrush

The Eagle & the Thrush
Written & Told by Algernon Black

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